North Carolina judges block voter identification law, saying it discriminates against blacks

North Carolina judges block voter identification law, saying it discriminates against blacks

North Carolina State University students line up to vote in the primary at the Pullen Community Center on March 15, 2016 in Raleigh, North Carolina. The North Carolina primary is the state’s first use of voter identification legislation, which does not cover student ID cards.

Sarah Dee Davis | Getty Images

A North Carolina panel of judges on Friday blocked the state’s voter identification law in a split decision, saying it discriminates against blacks.

Two judges on the panel said in their majority opinion that the evidence showed the law was “enacted with a discriminatory purpose”.

The Wake County Superior Court ruling also said the law “would have been enacted not in its current form, but for its tendency to discriminate against African-American voters.”

The decision comes after a test carried out earlier this year.

North Carolina’s Voter Identification Act was enacted in late 2018, when the state legislature overturned the veto of a Democrat, Governor Roy Cooper.

Judges Michael O’Fogludha and Vince Rogier Jr wrote the majority decision.

Judge Nathaniel Poove disagreed with the ruling, writing that “not a single piece of evidence was presented during this trial that any of the lawmakers acted with intent to racially discriminate.”

“The majority opinion in this case seeks to weave the speculation and conjecture that the plaintiffs have advanced as circumstantial evidence of discriminatory intent behind the Sessions Act 2018-144,” Poove wrote.

This is last minute news. Please check for updates.

.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here